Hi Gerwyn,

Quote Originally Posted by Gerwyn View Post
If the CAA want to look for a simple biomarker here it is.Why aren't they working on this?

January 18, 2009

[Note: The report abstracted here “presents evidence that chronic fatigue has a physical basis” - a dysfunction of the cells’ energy (ATP)-generating mitochondria - and that an “ATP profile” blood test is useful to measure degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and severity of illness. To read the full text of this free-access article, click here. And to read Dr. Myhill’s patient handout on CFS as a symptom of mitochondrial failure, click here.]

This study aims to improve the health of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) by interventions based on the biochemistry of the illness, specifically the function of mitochondria in producing ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency for all body functions, and recycling ADP (adenosine diphosphate) to replenish the ATP supply as needed.

Patients attending a private medical practice specializing in CFS were diagnosed using the Centers for Disease Control criteria. In consultation with each patient, an integer on the Bell Ability Scale [a measure of activity/function was assigned, and a blood sample was taken for the “ATP profile” test, designed for CFS and other fatigue conditions.

Each test produced 5 numerical factors which describe the availability of ATP in neutrophils, the fraction complexed with magnesium, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, and the transfer efficiencies of ADP into the mitochondria and ATP into the cytosol where the energy is used.

With the consent of each of 71 patients and 53 normal, healthy controls the 5 factors have been collated and compared with the Bell Ability Scale.

The individual numerical factors show that patients have different combinations of biochemical lesions.

When the factors are combined, a remarkable correlation is observed between the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and the severity of illness (P<0.001). Only 1 of the 71 patients overlaps the normal region.

The “ATP profile” test is a powerful diagnostic tool and can differentiate patients who have fatigue and other symptoms as a result of energy wastage by stress and psychological factors from those who have insufficient energy due to cellular respiration dysfunction.

The individual factors indicate which remedial actions, in the form of dietary supplements, drugs and detoxification, are most likely to be of benefit, and what further tests should be carried out.

Source: International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Jan 15, 2009:1, 1-16.Myhill S, Booth N, McLaren-Howard J. Sarah Myhill Limited, Llangunllo, Knighton, Powys, Wales; Department of Physics and Mansfield College, University of Oxford, Oxford UK; Acumen, Tiverton, Devon, UK [E-mail: Norman E Booth n.booth1@physics.ox.ac.uk]

NOW THAT WOULD BE A WORTHWHILE USE OF FUNDS.

+1 indeed,

Maarten.